Filmmaker

Rick Minnich

O

ur Man in Berlin is filmmaker and educator Rick Minnich. Born and raised in the American West, Rick came of age during the last years of the Cold War. After living on both sides of the Iron Curtain, he settled in Berlin months after the Wall came tumbling down.

Rick has dedicated his life to building bridges, rather than walls. His films cover a wide range of subjects, from growing up in the US during the Reagan era, his search for the perfect America, a foray into hillbilly music, the mysteries of amnesia, undetonated World War II bombs in Germany, and the attempt to connect Russia and the US with a tunnel beneath the Bering Strait. What all of Rick’s films have in common is a passion for intelligent and entertaining storytelling with a heart and a deep love of humanity.

  1. Short, 16mm, mono, color, 24'

    The Book Of Lenins

    Spurred on by his zealous publisher, a wide-eyed American photographer roams the globe in search of the last remaining Lenin statues. But what he finds isn’t exactly what his publisher had in mind. An ironic take on post-Cold War Eastern Europe.

  2. Documentary, Super 16mm, Dolby SR, color, 73’

    Good Guys & Bad Guys

    Good Guys & Bad Guys is a post-Cold War romp through suburban Los Angeles. In 1996, Rick Minnich returned to his native California for his ten-year high school class reunion to confront the right-wing suburban “patriots” who had made his life miserable during the Reagan era. The result is an entertaining and provocative look at what has become of the “Good Guys & Bad Guys” of yesteryear.

  3. Documentary, Super 16 mm, Dolby SR, color, 52’

    Heaven On Earth

    Branson, Missouri. Some call it the new Nashville or the Las Vegas of the Bible Belt. Over the past ten years, nearly 40 theaters have shot out of the ground in this once sleepy Ozark Mountain town of fewer than 4000 inhabitants. Here in America’s heartland, country legends and television and stage stars from yesteryear have reincarnated themselves and offer up good ol’ patriotic, Christian entertainment to six million tourists annually.

  4. Documentary, Super 16 mm, stereo, color, 80’

    Homemade Hillbilly Jam

    Hillbillies haven’t died off; they’ve simply become neo-hillbillies. Three families of musicians in the Ozark Mountains of Southwestern Missouri give new meaning to the word “hillbilly.” Float down the backwaters, soak up some old time religion, savor a washboard duel, and bask in the neon lights of the pseudo-hillbilly showtown Branson. Lean back and merge into hillbilliness.

  5. Documentary, HDCam, stereo, color, 83'

    Forgetting Dad

    “If your father no longer remembers you, does he stop being your father?” This is the poignant question posed by filmmaker Rick Minnich in the opening scene as he seeks answers for the reasons behind his father’s total amnesia following a minor car accident in 1990. A week after the accident, Richard Minnich no longer recognized any of his family or friends, and he couldn’t perform even the simplest of tasks.

  6. Documentary, HD, stereo, color, 52'

    The Bomb Hunters

    What does it feel like to live atop hundreds of bombs which could explode at any moment? The center of Nazi efforts to build an atomic bomb, Oranienburg became the target of the heaviest single Allied bombing of World War II. Now, seventy years later, the town’s charismatic mayor, his intrepid bomb disposal experts and a bomb-victim-turned-media-star are joining forces to rid their home of some 300 deadly bombs before they go off…

  7. Documentary, 4K, stereo, color, ca. 80'

    Mr. Greenfield (work-in-progress)

    Maximilian Grünfeld spoke Yiddish, lived in Czechoslovakia, lost his family to Nazi concentration camps, and had no business experience. Martin Greenfield lives in Brooklyn, speaks English, hand-tailors suits for U.S. presidents, and runs a bespoke clothing empire with high society clients and friends.

  8. Documentary, 4K, stereo, color, ca. 85'

    The Strait Guys (work-in-progress)

    For the past twenty-five years, 74-year-old retired tunnel engineer George Koumal and his jovial sidekick, 83-year-old Alaskan lawyer Joe Henri have been traveling the globe, lobbying for the ultimate anti-war weapon: a tunnel connecting the USA and Russia across the Bering Strait.